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A silver gilt lidded ewer and basin

en argent doré

Paris, 1713‑1714
Silversmith: Nicolas I Outrebon
The gilding circa 1785
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Détails

The ewer: H. 22.9 cm (9 in.); L. 16 cm (6 ¼ in.); D. 10.8 cm (4 ¼ in.)


The basin: H. 4 cm (1 ½ in.); 35 × 22.8 cm (13 ¾ × 9 in.)

Provenance

Jean‑Nicolas Marquis de la Porte de l’Arthaudière (1752‑1833) and his wife Joséphine Emé de Marcieu (1766‑1848) married in 1784


By inheritance, her nephew, Albéric Emé Marquis de Marcieu (1789‑1862)

Marks (the ewer)

Silversmith: “N.O B”, a crowned fleur‑de‑lis and two grains, for Nicolas I Outrebon (master in 1703)


Letter date: crowned V, for Paris 1713‑1714


Charge: reversed and crowned A, for Paris 1713‑1717


Discharge: two interlaced crowned L, for Paris 1713‑1717

Marks (the basin)

Contremarque: a rooster for Paris 1713‑1717


Discharge for old silver pieces: elephant trunk, for Paris 1744‑1750

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A silver gilt lidded ewer and basin - Galerie Kugel
A silver gilt lidded ewer and basin - Galerie Kugel
A silver gilt lidded ewer and basin - Galerie Kugel

A silver gilt lidded ewer and basin

en argent doré

Paris, 1713‑1714
Silversmith: Nicolas I Outrebon
The gilding circa 1785
Enquire
A silver gilt lidded ewer and basin - Galerie Kugel
A silver gilt lidded ewer and basin - Galerie Kugel

A superb and rare example of the goldsmith’s art during the reign of Louis XIV, which miraculously escaped contemporary edicts mandating the melting of precious metals. The complete stylistic vocabulary used by goldsmiths during the second half of the 17th century is visible in the ewer’s decoration.

Nicolas Outrebon was received as a silversmith master in Paris in 1703, approved by Nicolas Viardot. He settled place Dauphine and appears on the lists of 1715 as living on the Pont au Change. He is the father of the silversmiths Jean-Nicolas Outrebon (master in 1727) and Nicolas II Outrebon (master in 1735).

The coat of arms of this ewer and its basin are the one of Jean-Nicolas, Marquis de la Porte de l’Arthaudière (1752–1833) and his wife Joséphine Emé de Marcieu (1766–1848). Unlike his two brothers, he did not emigrate when the Revolution broke out, but stayed at the Arthaudière where he got arrested in 1793, and his possessions sequestrated.

A silver gilt lidded ewer and basin - Galerie Kugel